Veteran services

The Veteran Art Project helps California veterans with mental health

Using Art to Heal: How The Veteran Art Project Helps California Veterans Improve Their Mental Health

On Wednesday, thirty veteran artists showed their art in front of the State Capitol

Thirty artists gathered outside the State Capitol for the “Veterans Pop-Up Arts Cafe” on Wednesday. The free community event welcomed veterans from across California to provide a space for them to showcase their art in the mediums of ceramics, glass, painting, poetry, and more. The event was organized by The Veterans Art Project (VETART) and sponsored by the Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission of California. VETART is a community-based arts organization serving veterans, active duty military personnel, spouses, people dependents and their caregivers through art programs. Reginald Green, a 15-year-old navy veteran, told KCRA 3 he heard about VETART when he was seeking help for his depression. “It distracts me from what’s going on and I get lost creating stuff,” he said. “If you find something that can make you happy inside, focus on that.” Today, he creates large jars, jewelry and African clothing. Colin Hoffman served in the Marine Corps for about a year and then was injured while serving. He creates sculptures and illustrations, and wrote the children’s book “Baby Fatts: The Worlds”. First Dragon.” “It’s my medicine,” he said. “When I shape clay or spray paint or write, that’s what I do. My problems go away for a while. It’s an escape for me.” Tonya Savice served in the Air Force from 1982 to 1993. As a two-time suicide survivor, she said her discovery of art gave her new meaning. With the help of VETART, she started the non-profit organization “Spread Love Thru Arts” to help other women “something other than pain is what helps,” she said. at KCRA 3. “That’s why art heals.”

Thirty performers gathered outside the State Capitol on Wednesday for the “Veterans Pop-Up Arts Cafe.”

The free community event welcomed veterans from across California to provide a space for them to showcase their art in the mediums of ceramics, glass, painting, poetry, and more.

The event was organized by The Veterans Art Project (VETART) and sponsored by the California Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission.

VETART is a community arts organization that serves veterans, active duty military, spouses, dependents, and their caregivers through arts programs.

This programming, which includes free art lessons, aims to help veterans transition from military to civilian life and help veterans struggling with PTSD, depression and other mental health issues. .

Reginald Green, a 15-year-old navy veteran, told KCRA 3 he heard about VETART when he was seeking help for his depression.

“It distracts me from what’s going on and I get lost creating stuff,” he said. “If you find something that can make you happy inside, focus on that.”

Today, he creates large African jars, jewelry and clothing.

Colin Hoffman served in the Marine Corps for about a year and then was injured while serving.

He creates sculptures and illustrations, and wrote the children’s book “Baby Fatts: The Worlds First Dragon”.

“It’s my medicine,” he said. “When I shape clay or spray paint or write, that’s what I do. My problems go away for a while. It’s an escape for me.”

Tonya Savice served in the Air Force from 1982 to 1993.

As a two-time suicide survivor, she said her discovery of art gave her new meaning.

With the help of VETART, she started the non-profit “Spread Love Thru Arts” to help other women.

“When you treat something other than the pain, that’s what helps,” she told KCRA 3. “That’s why art heals.”